Pick of the Week (past/present/future)

 

 

I tend to chaotically internet bookmark things. I have a folder of links to things to listen to, and when that folder becomes so unwieldy that it takes almost a minute to scroll to the bottom of the list, it’s time to start a new folder. I never win against the incredible tide of new music that’s out there – I now have several folders brimming with things I haven’t gotten around to listen to yet. I keep going though. Things that I do listen to and particularly enjoy go into a “Blog pick” folder, most of which ends up here. But not all. Today I’m including a few things that for no particular reason at all didn’t make it onto the blog, but really should have.

After being on the blog, most of the links get moved into my “To buy” folder, and while it’s an eternal struggle against the tide with that folder too, it’s a worthy challenge!  

 

 

What to make of this album by Bastardgeist? A couple of tracks in and I wasn’t sure if I was fully into what I was listening to, but wanted to hear more. By the end it felt like I’d been on quite a journey, and vowed to experience it again. Now I have experienced it again, the feeling is much the same: this is a unique multilayered work of art that invites the listener to engage with it. It may take multiple listens to fully appreciate, but there are wonders to be found here…

 

 

Devon folk singer Jim Causley sets the poetry of his ancestor Charles Causley to music with a little help from his friends. Beautiful.

 

 

Inspired by the discovery of a forgotten box of postcards and photos in the family attic, this radiophonic box of delights by Keith Seatman fell through the cracks of my “Blog Pick” link folder, and should have been featured long ago. 

 

I’ve been meaning to mention the Australian Radio show The Golden Apples of the Sun for a while now. In their own words it is: “A NEW PLACE FOR PSYCH, FOLK, AND ELECTRONICA AND A LAUNCH-PAD TO NEW SUB-GENRES. THE GOLDEN APPLES COLLECTIVE IS A SMALL INFORMED AND PASSIONATE GROUP OF MUSIC-LOVERS WHO OVER 2 HOURS PRESENT A MELTING POT OF MELODY, BEATS, FIELD RECORDINGS AND ATMOSPHERICS FULL OF THEMATIC ELEMENTS AND AN EDGE.” It really is a great show. Listen here.

(Turns out I have actually mentioned The Golden Apples of the Sun before, back in April, but I’ll leave the entry in for further encouragement.)

 

 

Abra Kabra is a magical dope-beat collaboration that levitates above the norm with it’s great choice of samples and quality production.

 

 

Some husky haunt-techno by OOBE on Opal Tapes.

 

 

And some solid modern prog by Midday Veil.

 

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Beautiful Mars: a Tumblr featuring images and posts from HiRISE, the high resolution camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO, NASA). To see more go here.

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Cocker spaniel by his side, Rees wanders the marshes of Hackney, Leyton and Walthamstow, avoiding his family and the pressures of life. He discovers a lost world of Victorian filter plants, ancient grazing lands, dead toy factories and tidal rivers on the edgelands of a rapidly changing city. Ghosts are his friends. As strange tales of bears, crocodiles, magic narrowboats and apocalyptic tribes begin to manifest themselves, Rees embarks on a psychedelic journey across time and into the dark heart of London. 

It soon becomes clear that the very existence of this unique landscape is at threat. For on all sides of the marshland, the developers are closing in… 

Marshland is a deep map of the East London marshes, a blend of local history, folklore and weird fiction, where nothing is quite as it seems. 

This book contains striking illustrations from artist Ada Jusic. ” 

Seems like Marshland is going to be a must-read for the wyrd generation, and is available for pre-order at a special price of £8.99 via paypal until the 25th October here.

 

 

I leave you with Star Drunk. This was genuinely written by drunk people and performed by drunk actors, and it’s brilliant! Well worth watching the short behind the scenes vid below too.

 

 

 

 

 

Pick of the Week (past/present/future)

 

I’m super busy with the next incarnation of my zine Wyrd Daze at the moment, but wanted to quickly post some of the music I’ve been enjoying recently.

I’ll write a proper post about it before too long, but briefly: Wyrd Daze is a collaborative zine of experimental creativity which began as a one-off print edition and will continue as a monthly digital zine from the end of October.

Submission are open for writing, music, art, photography, video, and pretty much anything else! The zine will be available via a monthly subscription of $5.

The response to the call for submission has been wonderful, and I’m really excited about how things are developing. Inquiries and submissions should be sent to wyrd.daze@gmail.com

 

Right then, on with the show!

A few seconds in to the above album Edena by Piotr Kurek, and I knew I was going to love it. There’s something about komische music that pushes my bliss buttons. The term komische musik was originally used to describe (what the English referred to as) krautrock bands who incorporated synthesizers prominently into their music, such as Popol Vuh and Tangerine Dream. For me, the term adequately describes a cosmic vibe distinct from other electronic music. One definition of the German word komische (in relation to music/k)is: cosmic, pertaining to the universe as a whole. Can you dig it?

See also The Wyrding Module and Norm Chambers aka Panabrite, both of which I have talked about here before. (I would featured here The Wyrding Module‘s excellent new cassette release Subtemple Session II, but it’s already sold out and there’s no link to listen as yet.)

And see also the release below: Eventide by Sneaky Snake, which I’ve just discovered. Sublime.

 

I do so love my komische music. If you know of any gems, send me links!

 

 

The follow-up to Robin the Fog‘s seminal hauntological release The Ghosts of Bush is here, and mighty fine it is too! There’s still a few copies of the one-time pressing of 300 copies, so grab one while you can. Pay what you want for the digital version. Skip back to track one on the Bandcamp player above to listen from the beginning.

 

 

Drone maestros Lost Trail and The Implicit Order combine to create the above ethereal delight The Black Ridge Tapes. (Skip to track 1 for the whole thing)

 

 

And The Implicit Order continue the prolific output with a split with Elizabeth Veldon called Cruising and Stuff.

 

 

An excellent EP of broken dream pop by Machine est mon Coeur. (Again, skip to track 1 to listen from the beginning)

 

 

A 7″ of ghostly bass beats by Lost Few

 

 

A mesmerising video of a live jam by Bristolian bass collective Young Echo.

Stream Young Echo‘s debut album via Fact here.

 

 

I leave you with the incredibly talented Robin Fisher aka Salvage my Dream, and his beautiful collection of lo-fi songs with the album Desert, Sea and Grass.

 

 

 

Pick of the Week (past/present/future)

 

Salutations!

 

Should have mentioned this last time: the new release by Anna Meredith, the Jet Black Raider EP  has been unleashed upon the world and it’s incredible! You can buy it here for just £3, and stream it and her previous release Black Prince Fury here. Below is the track Orlock from the new EP If you haven’t heard it yet, prepare to have your mind blown…   

 

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Richard Chartier, under the moniker Pinkcourtesyphone, recently contributed an outstandingly sculpted hallucinatory mix to the Secret Thirteen online journal, and you can sample its delights and download here.

(A new Pinkcourtesyphone album is imminent!)

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Alexandra Mackenzie is an artist and musician from Toronto who clearly exists in her own magnificent psychedelic dimension… 

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Alexandra’s website is here, her Tumblr here.

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I’m a bit baffled as to why I hadn’t come across modern krautrockers Datashock before now, but better late than never, eh? They’ve recently released a new cassette, but it’s their great live-session recorded double LP Pyramiden von Gießen that I’ve embedded above. Lose yourself!

 

Clearlight is not the 60’s American psychedelic band Clear Light , nor 70’s French prog-rockers Clearlight, nor the more recent American instrumental heavy metal band Clearlight. He’s the deep dubstep (and beyond) artist Clearlight, m’kay? Anyways, I’m just discovering his music, and it’s pretty exciting to these ears. Above is a downloadable mix spun for Sub.FM .

 

 

The Active Listener is another thing I’ve been meaning to mention for ages. New Zealander Nathan Ford is the Active Listener, and he tirelessly reviews music on his blog: primarily psychedelic but with occasional forays into weird folk and sounds of a Hauntological nature. The blog can be found here, and the latest sampler of music compiled by Nathan can be heard and downloaded above. 

 

 

Songs for Sleep: a somnambulistic dreamscape. 

 

 

The Isolatarium is a science fiction story by Brad Rose, musician and curator of Digitalis Recordings. As you can see above, there is also a compilation album that goes with it, with contributions from Charlatan (one of Rose’s projects), Giant Claw, and Best Available Technology, among others. The ebook is going for just $2, and includes the album. You can read a small excerpt of the story here.

 

 

I first came across the enigmatic Foodman with this brilliant release on the bonkers Orange Milk Records, and discovered the above release after checking out The Isolatarium on Digitalis. There’s something beguilingly wonderful about Foodman’s authentic jittery Japtronica.

 

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I leave you with an in-depth article celebrating 50 years of the cassette, here.

 

 

 

A dérive in Old Quebec City: August 25th

 

It’s been a while since I consciously embarked upon a dérive, but last weekend my wife and I headed over the fleuve to Old Quebec City and allowed whim to point the way…

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I’ve no idea what this group call themselves, but their Irish influence folky music was rather pleasing. We caught the last couple of songs, which are features in the montage of field recordings I took during the dérive below. Why not have a listen while you view the remaining photographs? (The recording is a bit windy at times, but listenable) 

 

If you’d like to see one of the photographs in more detail, enlarge it with a click!

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Quebec is an incredibly vibrant city, particularly throughout the summer, when literally every week is packed with festivals, events, buskers, and people exploring, shopping, dining, and having a good time. There’s always something to see and do.

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We drifted upon an art exhibition amidst these gardens situated within the vast and beautiful Battlefields Park. The park also contains The Plains of Abraham, where a pivotal battle took place, part of the Seven Years’ War between the English And French.

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